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Sea Change

'Sea Change' is a study of the tides around the coast of Britain. The views in each diptych are taken from identical positions at low water and high water, usually six or eighteen hours apart. The tide comes and goes twice each day, but even when one spends a whole day by the sea it's easy to miss how dramatic tidal change can be. I am interested in showing how landscape changes over time through natural processes and cycles. The camera that records low and high tide side by side enables us to observe simultaneously two moments in time, two states of nature. Recent landscape photography has often focused on human shaping and reshaping of the environment: agriculture, urbanisation, globalisation, pollution. Even when critical and committed, this approach can emphasise - even glamorise - humanity's power over nature. I'm concerned to rediscover nature's own powers: the elemental forces and processes that underlie and shape the planet. The tides are one of our world's great natural cycles. Pulled by the Moon's gravity, great volumes of water move in sea and ocean basins, and pile up in channels, bays, and estuaries. Each successive tide varies in height and timing. Higher 'spring' tides occur every two

weeks, at new and full moon, very high spring tides in months close to the spring and autumn equinoxes. I hope these photographs will increase awareness of natural change, of landscape as dynamic process rather than static image. Attending to Earth's rhythms can help us to reconnect with the fundamentals of our planet, which we ignore at our peril. The pictures can also serve as a warning of climate change. The tide floods in and quickly recedes, but rising sea levels will flood our shores and not recede for thousands or millions of years. Many of the views in these pictures may have disappeared in 100 years' time. 'Sea Change' is an example of 'comparative photography', where two or more images show changes in time (or other dimensions). The 'rephotography' of Mark Klett and Nicholas Nixon's portraits of the Brown sisters are well-known examples.

Technical information The photographs were taken on colour negative film with a 5x4 camera or digitally with a Phase One. The time between high and low water averages 6 hours 20 minutes, but in many places the tide remains almost unchanged at flood or ebb for up to an hour. This means that high water/low water pairs do not need to be taken exactly 6 hours 20 minutes apart. Most of the pictures were taken at high spring tides: it is on these occasions, when the water recedes furthest at ebb and rises highest at flood, that tidal change appears at its most dramatic. BOOK 'Sea Change', with an introduction by Robert Macfarlane, is available from:-

Ansty Down

Ansty Down is part of a long rounded ridge of chalk that reaches 22 kilometres from the outskirts of Salisbury to near the village of Donhead St Andrew. The track that runs along the top is an ancient way used since Neolithic times. In the 18th and 19th centuries it was a coach road from Salisbury to Shaftesbury. Today it is used by ramblers and riders, dirt bikers and 4-wheel drive enthusiasts. Some years one or two Romany caravans have wintered there. Other times one might find a dumped mattress or armchair, a burnt-out car. The walk up to and along Ansty Down had become familiar to me over many years. Particular views, trees, geometries came to stand out. I found a deep joy in returning to the same places over and over, observing them in different lights, the tangles of nature, the cycle of seasons, the variations of daytime and weather. The five walks that form this project were taken between December 2003 and October 2004. The photographs were made in the course of a single walk or two walks on consecutive days.

Jumping for Joyce

These photographs were taken for Jumping for Joyce, a group exhibition at the Francis Kyle Gallery in London on the theme of the Irish writer James Joyce. The locations are around Dublin Bay, from Howth in the north to Sandycove in the south. Sandycove is home to the Martello tower that features in the opening episode of Joyce's novel, Ulysses, and the famous Forty Foot pool where Buck Mulligan goes to bathe. People have been swimming there, in all seasons and weathers, for over 200 years. When I took these photographs in April 2013, a bitter east wind was blowing and the sea was very cold. The regular Forty Foot bathers are a hardy lot, however, and they advanced purposefully into the water without flinch or pause. Some swam for 10 or 20 minutes, others went in for a quick and bracing dunk - 'doing a teabag', they call it. A number of the photographs are single images inspired by a phrase or place in Ulysses. The view towards Howth from Sandycove brought to mind the memorable phrase, "The snotgreen sea. The scrotumtightening sea." And the image of wind blowing sand over seashells on Sandymount strand reminds me of a reflection of Stephen Dedalus: "A very short space of time through very short times of space." Dublin Bay is a fascinating and varied area, with well-to-do suburbs and Georgian terraces, ferries and

container ships coming and going into Dun Laoghaire and Dublin port, the peninsula of Howth and its wild cliffs and splendid lighthouse, the industrial neighbourhood of Ringsend at the mouth of the Liffey. In the strong easterly, the waves came galloping in with the rising tide over the vast strand just as Joyce described them: "The whitemaned seahorses, champing, brightwindbridled, the steeds of Mananaan." Another group of pictures plays with the idea of 'time frames' - a phrase that describes how the stream-of-consciousness passages in Ulysses switch between different moments in time and from one intensely focused observation to another. Two triptychs show bathers at Sandycove, while a third is inspired by Dedalus' great question: "Am I walking into eternity along Sandymount strand?" The last group of photographs is a continuation of my Sea Change series and compares low- and high-tide views towards the soaring chimneys of Poolbeg power station, colloquially known as the Pigeon House. In Ulysses, Dedalus "turned northeast and crossed the firmer sands towards the Pigeon House." Originally a military barracks, the Pigeon House became Dublin's first power station, generating electricity from 1903. It is located at the mouth of the Liffey, where the Great South Wall extends far out to sea to protect the approach to the port of Dublin. Today's successor

power station was built in the 1960s around the original. Its chimneys are amongst the tallest structures in Ireland, over 680 feet high, and draw the eye from all round Dublin Bay. Limited edition prints of these photographs are available from: Francis Kyle Gallery 9 Maddox Street London W1S 2QE. Tel: +44 (0)20 7499 6870. Email: info@franciskylegallery.com

Number of profiles: 1

Born in London, Michael Marten started taking photographs as a teenager and has been involved with photography ever since. His first job was caption writer at the Camera Press photo agency. In 1973 he was one of a group who published 'An Index of Possibilities', an alternative encyclopedia of ideas. In 1979 he started the specialist photo agency, Science Photo Library. He has been co-author of several books of scientific imagery, including 'Worlds Within Worlds' (1978), 'Microcosmos' (1987), 'The Particle Odyssey' (2002). Since 2003 he has concentrated on landscape photography. His first series was 'Five Walks on Ansty Down' (2004). He has been working on 'Sea Change', his study of the tides, since 2003. EXHIBITIONS & AWARDS 2009 Blue Sky Gallery, Portland, Oregon 2009 Grazia Neri Gallery, Milan 2009 Ringe Bibliotek, Ringe - part of Fototriennale.dk festival, Denmark 2011 Libreria del Mare, Palermo 2011 LensCulture International Exposure Awards - Grand Prize, portfolio 2012 gallery@oxo, London 2012 'Snapshots' group show, Brick Lane Gallery, London 2013 'Jumping for Joyce' group show, Francis Kyle Gallery, London 2013 'Summer Show', Belgrave Gallery, St Ives All photographs copyright Michael Marten

SEA CHANGE PRINTS C-type prints made on a Chromira printer from digital files. Three sizes: a) 12x30" (31x76 cm) - edition of 50 £ 300 - 375 - US$ 500 b) 20x40" (51x102 cm) - edition of 8 from* £ 750 - 950 - US$ 1250 c) 30x60" (76x152 cm) - edition of 6 from* £ 1200 - 1500 - US$ 2000 * Prices of the 20" and 30" editions are stepped (prices increase as the edition sells out). All prints are diptychs: low and high tide images side by side on a single print. The length of prints varies with the two larger sizes. Typically they are about 20x45" (51x102cm) and 30x65" (76x165cm), but can vary considerably, especially the panoramic pairs. If length is important, check with me first. Prints at different sizes and separate prints of low and high tide images are available on request. Prices include VAT. Postage & packing is extra. ANSTY DOWN prints - please email me. JUMPING FOR JOYCE prints - please contact Francis Kyle Gallery, London. SEA CHANGE BOOK 'Sea Change', with an introduction by Robert Macfarlane, is published by Kehrer Verlag. You can see or buy it here:-

+44 (0)20 7243 3070

Number of Titles: 13

February

May

August

October

December

South-West

North-West

North-East

South-East

Recent work

Jumping for Joyce

Jumping for Joyce

Jumping for Joyce

Number of Captions: 137

Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria. 16 April 2004. High water 10.10am, low water 4.15pm

Tidal road to Sunderland Point, Lancashire. 29 and 30 March 2010. Low water 6.15pm, high water 1pm

Lune estuary, Lancashire. 29 March 2010. High water 12.30pm, low water 5pm

Blackpool, Lancashire. 16 August 2010. Low water 11.20am, high water 4pm

Blackpool, Lancashire. 16 August 2010. Low water 12.20pm, high water 4.30pm

Crosby, Liverpool. 5 and 7 April 2008. High water 12 noon, low water 9am

Hale, Merseyside. 9 April 2008. Low water 9.40am, high water 3pm

Dwyryd estuary, Gwynedd. 16 and 17 October 2008. Low water 5.10pm, high water 11.10am

Porthcawl, Glamorgan. 17 May 2007. Low water 12 noon, high water 8pm

Worms Head, Glamorgan. 25 June 2005. High water 9.45am, low water 4pm

Severn Bridge, Monmouthshire. 8 and 9 March 2008. Low water 2.30pm, high water 8.20am

Watchet, Somerset. 7 and 8 March 2007. Low water 3.45pm, high water 9.30am

Lynmouth, Devon. 17 and 19 September 2005. Low water 12.45pm, high water 7.30pm

Bedruthan Steps, Cornwall. 25 and 31 August 2007. High water 4.30pm, low water 2pm

Perranporth, Cornwall. 29 and 30 August 2007. Low water 12 noon, high water 8pm

Perranporth, Cornwall. 28 and 29 August 2007. High water 6pm, low water 11.20am

Hayle river mouth, Cornwall. 18 March 2010. Low water 12 noon, high water 6pm

St Ives, Cornwall. 12 June 2010. Low water 12.30pm, high water 6.30pm

St Michael's Mount, Cornwall. 25 and 26 June 2009. Low water 1.15pm, high water 8am

Howick, Northumberland. 16 and 17 September 2004. High water 6pm, low water 12 noon

The Fleet, Weymouth, Dorset. 18 and 19 February 2007. Low water 1.30pm, high water 8.30am

Burnmouth, Berwickshire. 30 September 2003. Low water 10.20am, high water 4.15pm

The 'shore goats', Berwickshire. 27 September 2003. Low water 9.30am, 11.30am, 1.10pm, high water 3.10pm

Harbour, Berwickshire. 22 August 2005. Low water 11am, high water 6pm

North Berwick, East Lothian. 20 August 2005. Low water 10.45am, 2.20pm, high water 4.20pm

Vementry, Shetland. 31 July 2003. High water 11.15am, low water 4.50pm

North Berwick, East Lothian. 20 August 2005. Low water 11.15am, high water 3.40pm

Lower Stillaig, Argyll. 13 March 2009. Low water 7.40am, high water 2.40pm

Cullen, Moray. 29 and 30 March 2006. Low water 6.40pm, high water 12 noon

Lower Stillaig, Argyll. 13 March 2009. Low water 8am, high water 2.20pm

Water of Fleet, Galloway. 2 April 2007. Low water 8.10am, high water 1pm, low water 4.30pm

Salmon fishery, Solway Firth. 27 and 28 March 2006. Low water 5.20pm, high water 12 noon

Berwick-on-Tweed, Northumberland. 2 and 3 October 2003. Low water 12.30pm, high water 9.45am

St Mary's lighthouse, Whitley Bay, Northumberland. 17 and 20 September 2008. High water 5.50pm, low water 1pm

Staithes, Yorkshire. 14 September 2004. Low water 9.45am, high water 4.30pm

Flamborough, Yorkshire. 27 and 28 September 2007. High water 5pm, low water 11.45am

Brancaster Staithe, Norfolk. 8 October 2006. High water 7.30am, low water 3pm

Mussel storage pond, Brancaster Staithe, Norfolk. 10 March 2005. Low water 1pm, high water 5.30pm

Wells-next-the-Sea, Norfolk. 10 September 2006. High water 8.40am, low water 3pm

Wivenhoe, Essex. 23 March 2007. Low water 9.30am, high water 4.15pm

Tollesbury, Essex. 23 March 2007. Low water 10.20am, 1.30pm, high water 2.45pm

Southend-on-Sea, Essex. 10 September 2010. Low water 7.45am, high water 2pm

Leigh-on-Sea, Essex. 11 September 2010. Low water 8.30am, high water 4pm

Holehaven Creek, Thames estuary, Essex. 10 and 11 September 2010. High water 3.30pm, low water 10.20am

Holehaven Creek, Thames estuary, Essex. 10 and 11 September 2010. High water 4.20pm, low water 10.15am

Thames estuary, Grain, Kent. 21 February 2008. Low water 8.10am, high water 2.20pm

Gillingham, Kent. 23 February 2008. Low water 10am, high water 2.50pm

Cuckmere Haven, Sussex. 12 August 2006. Low water 9.15am, high water 2.50pm

Beaumont Quay, Essex. 30 and 31 August 2011. High water 2.10pm, low water 7.40am

Walton-on-the-Naze, Essex. 31 August 2011. Low water 9.40am, high water 1.15pm

Trebarwith Strand, Cornwall. 21 and 22 March 2011. High water 5pm, low water 12.30pm

St Ives, Cornwall. 15 June 2011. Low water 12.30pm, high water 6.30pm

Rock, Cornwall. 21 and 22 March 2011. Low water 11.30am, high water 7.20am

Polzeath, Cornwall. 21 and 22 March 2011. Low water 12 noon, high water 7am

St Cwyfan's 'church-in-the-sea', Isle of Anglesey. 9 April 2012. High water 12 noon, low water 5.45pm

Penmon, Isle of Anglesey. 8 and 9 April 2012. Low water 6.50pm, high water 2pm

At the Forty Foot hole

Sandycove bather

'Walking into eternity on Sandymount strand'

Dogs on Sandymount strand

Sandymount strand

'A very short space of time through very short times of space'

'The snotgreen sea. The scrotumtightening sea.'

Ireland's Eye

'The mirror of water'

'Pigeon House' from the Great South Wall ('Ulysses' entering the port of Dublin). 8 and 9 April 2013. Low water 5.30pm, high water 10.20am

'Pigeon House' from North Bull Wall, Dublin. 10 and 11 April 2013. Low water 6.15pm, high water 12.40pm

'Pigeon House' from North Bull Wall, Dublin. 10 and 12 April, 2013. Low water 6pm, high water 1.30pm

Sandycove bather

At the Forty Foot hole

'Walking into eternity on Sandymount strand'

Dogs on Sandymount strand

Sandymount strand

'A very short space of time through very short times of space'

'The snotgreen sea. The scrotumtightening sea.'

Ireland's Eye

'The mirror of water'

'Pigeon House' from the Great South Wall ('Ulysses' entering the port of Dublin). 8 and 9 April 2013. Low water 5.30pm, high water 10.20am

'Pigeon House' from North Bull Wall, Dublin. 10 and 11 April 2013. Low water 6.15pm, high water 12.40pm

'Pigeon House' from North Bull Wall, Dublin. 10 and 12 April 2013. Low water 6pm, high water 1.30pm